Κυριακή, 8 Ιουνίου 2014


OFFICIAL CYPRUS BRANCH

Representative Chairman For Cyprus Branch


Savvas Papademetriou



What is Karate-Do
Kancho Kanazawa Performing Kata
In Okinawa, a miraculous and mysterious martial art has come down to us from the past. It is said that one who masters its techniques can defend himself readily without resort to weapons and can perform remarkable feats: the breaking of several thick boards with his fist or ceiling panels of a room with a kick. With his shuto ("sword hand") he can kill a bull with a single stroke; he can pierce the flank of a horse with his open hand; he can cross a room grasping the beams of the ceiling with his fingers, crush a green bamboo stalk with his bare hand, shear a hemp rope with a twist, or gouge soft rock with his hands.
Some consider these aspects of this miraculous and mysterious martial art to be the essence of Karate-do. But such feats are a small part of karate, playing a role analogous to the straw-cutting test of kendo [Japanese fencing], and it is erroneous to think that there is no more to Karate-do than this. In fact, true Karate-do places weight upon spiritual rather than physical matters, as we shall discuss. True Karate-do is this: that in daily life, one's mind and body be trained and developed in a spirit of humility; and that in critical times, one be devoted utterly to the cause of justice.
KARA
Nobuaki Kanazawa Sensei Performing Kata
Karate-do is a martial art peculiar to Okinawa in its origins. Although it has in the past tended to be confused with Chinese boxing because of the use of the chinese "kara" character in its earlier name, in fact for the past thousand years, the study and practice of masters and experts, through which it was nurtured and perfected and formed into the unified martial art that it is today, took place in Okinawa. It is, therefore, not a distortion to represent it as an Okinawan martial art.
One may ask why the chinese "kara" character has been retained for so long. As I discuss in the section "The Development of Karate-do," I believe that at the time the influence of Chinese culture was at its peak in Japan, many experts in the martial arts traveled to China to practice Chinese boxing. With their new knowledge, they altered the existing martial art, called Okinawa-te, weeding out its bad points and adding good points to it, thus working it into an elegant art. It may be speculated that they considered "kara" (with the chinese character) an appropriate new name. Since, even in contemporary Japan, there are many people who are impressed by anything that is foreign, it is not difficult to imagine the high regard for anything Chinese that prevailed during that period in Okinawa. Even at the time of the present writer's youth, lack of a full set of Chinese furniture and furnishings in one's home was a serious impediment to the social influence of any leading family. With this background, the reason for the choice of the chinese "kara" character, meaning "Chinese," as a simple case of exoticism is apparent.
Following tradition, the writer has in the past continued to use the chinese character. However, because of the frequent confusion with Chinese boxing, and the fact that the Okinawan martial art may now be considered a Japanese martial art, it is inappropriate, and in a sense degrading, to continue use of the old "kara" in the name. For this reason, in spite of many protests, we have abandoned the use of it to replace it with the new character KARA.
Murakami Sensei Performing Kata
WHAT IS THE MEANING OF KARA
The first connotation of kara indicates that karate is a technique that permits one to defend himself with his bare hands and fists without weapons.
Second, just as it is the clear mirror that reflects without distortion, or the quiet valley that echoes a sound, so must one who would study Karate-do purge himself of selfish and evil thoughts, for only with a clear mind and conscience can he understand that which he receives. This is another meaning of the element kara in Karate-do.
Next, he who would study Karate-do must always strive to be inwardly humble and outwardly gentle. However, once he has decided to stand up for the cause of justice, then he must have the courage expressed in the saying, "Even if it must be ten million foes, I go!" Thus, he is like the green bamboo stalk: hollow (kara) inside, straight, and with knots, that is, unselfish, gentle, and moderate. This meaning is also contained in the element kara of Karate-do.
Finally, in a fundamental way, the form of the universe is emptiness (kara), and, thus, emptiness is form itself. There are many kinds of martial arts, judo, kendo, sojitsu ("spear techniques"), bojitsu ("stick techniques"), and others, but at a fundamental level all these arts rest on the same basis as Karate-do. It is no exaggeration to say that the original sense of Karate-do is at one with the basis of all martial arts. Form is emptiness, emptiness is form itself. The kara of Karate-do has this meaning.








 



SHOTOKAN SHIHAN-KAI KARATE ACADEMY 
( MEMBER OF THE CYPRUS KARATE FEDERATION)

OFFICIAL DOJO 

38, Ag. Nektariou
(Behind Lanition Stadium) 

TRAINING HOURS

MONDAY TO FRIDAY 4.30 - 9 PM
SATURDAYS 5 PM - 8.30 PM

                    Tel: +35725254818  -   +3572525255704
    
email:  skiefcy@gmail.com  

Mob: +357 99678325

 ALL GRADES AND NEW STUDENTS ARE WELLCOME

=====> NEW STUDENTS AND ADVANCED CLASSES<====


Instructor: Savvas Papademetriou

                                         サヴァス パパディミトゥリウ
                      先生 五段
   

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Funakoshi O Sensei
 
 
Sensei Funakoshi Gichin Funakoshi was born in Shuri, Okinawa in 1868. As a boy, he was trained by two famous masters of that time. Each trained him in a different Okinawan martial art. From Yasutsune Azato he learned Shuri-te. From Yasutsune Itosu, he learned Naha-te. It would be the melding of these two styles that would one day become Shotokan karate. Funakoshi-sensei is the man who introduced karate to Japan. In 1917 he was asked to perform his martial art at a physical education exhibition sponsored by the Ministry of Education. He was asked back again in 1922 for another exhibition. He was asked back a third time, but this was a special performance. He demonstrated his art for the emporer and the royal family! Afer this, Funakoshi-sensei decided to remain in Japan and teach and promote his art.
Gichin Funakoshi passed away in 1957 at the age of 88. Aside from creating Shotokan karate and introducing it to Japan and the world, he also wrote the very book on the subject of karate, "Ryukyu Kempo: Karate-do". He also wrote "Karate-Do Kyohan" - The Master Text, the "handbook" of Shotokan and he wrote his autobiography, "Karate-Do: My Way of Life". These books and his art are a fitting legacy for this unassuming and gentle man.
IF THERE IS ONE MAN WHO COULD BE CREDITED with placing karate in the position it enjoys on the Japanese mainland today, it is Gichin Funakoshi. This meijin (master) was born in Shuri, Okinawa, and didn't even begin his second life as harbinger of official recognition for karate on the mainland until he was fifty-three years old.
Funakoshi's story is very similar to that of many greats in karate. He began as a weakling, sickly and in poor health, whose parents brought him to Itosu for his karte training. Between his doctor , Tokashiki, who prescribed certain herbs that would strengthen him, and Itosu's good instruction, Funakoshi soon blossomed. He became a good student, and with Asato, Arakaki and Matsumura as his other teachers, expertise and his highly disciplined mind.
When he finally came to Japan from Okinawa in 1922, he stayed among his own people at the prefectural students's dormitory at Suidobata, Tokyo. He lived in a small room alongside the entrance and would clean the dormitouy during the day when the students were in their classes. At night, he would teach them karate.
After a short time, he had earned sufficient means to open his first school in Meishojuku. Following this, his shotokan in Mejiro was opened and he finally had a place from which he sent forth a variety of outstanding students, such as Takagi and Nakayama of Nippon Karate Kyokai, Yoshida of Takudai, Obata of Keio, Noguchi of Waseda, and Otsuka, the founder of Wado-Ryu karate. It is said that in his travels in and around Japan, while giving demonstrations and lectures, Funakoshi always had Otsuka accompany him.
The martial arts world in Japan, especially in the early Twenties and up to the early Fourties, enjoyed ultra-nationalists were riding high, and they looked down their noses at any art that was not purely called it a pagan and savage art.  Funakoshi overcame this prejudice and finally gained formal recognition of karate as one of the Japanese martial arts by 1941.
Needless to say, many karate clubs flourished on mainland Japan. In 1926, karate was instirudes in Tokyo University. Three years later, karate was formally organized on a club level by three students: Matsuda Katsuichi, Himotsu Kazumi and Nakachi K.,Funakoshi was their teacher. He also organized karate clubs in Keio University and in the Shichi-Tokudo, a barracks situated in a corner of the palace grounds.
Funkoshi visited the Shichi-Tokudo every other day to teach and was always accompained by Otsuka, reputed to be one of the most brilliant of his students in Japan proper. Otsuka's favorite kata was the Naihanchi, which he performed before the royalty of Japan with another outstanding atudent named Oshima, who performed the Pinan kata (Heian).
One day, when Otsuka was teaching at the Shichi-Tokudo, a student, Kogura, from Keio University who had a san-dan degree (3rd-degree black belt) in kendo (Japanese fencing) and also a black belt in karate, took a sword and faced Otsuka. All the other students watched to see what would happen. They felt that no one could face the shinken (open blade) held by a kendo expert.
Otsuka calmly watched Kogura and the moment he made a move with his sword, Otsuka swept him off his feet. As this was unrehearsed, ot attested to the skill of Otsuka. It also bore out Funakoshi's philosophy that kata practice was more tah sufficient in times of need.
In 1927, three men, Miki, Bo and Hirayama decided that kata practice was not enough and tried to introduce jiyukumite (free-fighting). They devised protective clothig and used kendo masks in their matches in order to utilize full contact. Funakoshi heard about these bouts and, when he could not discourage such attempts at what he consedered belittling to the art of karate, he stopped coming to the Shichi-Tokudo. Both Funakoshi and his top student, Otsuka, never showed their faces there again.
When Funakoshi came to mainland Japan, he brought 16 kata with him: 5 pinam, 3 naihanchi, kushanku dai, kushanku sho, seisan, patsai, wanshu, chinto, jutte and jion. He kept his students on the before they progressed to the more advanced forms. The repetitious training that he instituted paid divedends; his students went on to produce the most precise, exact type of karate taught anywhere.
Jigoro Kano, the founder of modern judo, one invited Funakoshi and a friend, Makoto Gima, to perform at the Kodokan (then located at Tomisaka). Approximately a hundred people watched the performance. Gim, who had studied under Yabu Kentsu as a youth in Okinawa, performed the naihanshi shodan, and Fuankoshi performed the koshokun (kushanku dai).
Kanso sensei watched the performance and asked Funakoshi about the techniques involved. He was greatly impressed. He invited Funakoshi and Gima to a tendon (fish and rice) dinner, during which he sang and made jokes to put Funakoshi at ease.
Irrespective of his sincerity in teaching the art of true karate, Funakoshi was not without his detractors. His critics scorned his insistence on the kata and dectied what they called "soft" karate that wasted too much time. Funakoshi insisted on hito-kata sanen (three years on one kata).
Funakoshi was a humble man. He preached and practiced an essential humility. He did not preach the is rooted in the true perspective of things, full of life and awareness. He lived at peace with himself and with his fellow men.
Whenever the name of Gichin Funakoshi is mentioned, it brings to mind the parble of "A Man of Tao (Do) and a Little Man". As it is told, a student once asked, "What is the difference between a man of Tao and a little man?" The sensei replies, "It is simple. When the little man receives his first dan (degree or rank), he can hardly wait to run home and shout at the top of his voice to tell everyone that he made his first dan. Upon receiving his second dan, he will climb to the rooftops and shout to the people. Upon receiving his third dan, he will jump in his automobile and parade through town with horns blowing, telling one and all about his third dan".
The sensei continues, "When the man of Tao receives his first dan, he will bow his head in gratitude. Upon receiving his second dan, he will bow his head and his shoulders. Upon receiving his third dan, he will bow to the waist and quietly walk alongside the wall so that people will not see him or notice him".
Funakoshi was a man of Tao. He placed no emphasis on competitions, record breaking or championships. He placed emphasis on individual selfperfection. He believe in the common decency and respect that one human being owed to another. He was the master of masters.


NOTE Funakoshi sincerely believed it would take a lifetime to master a handful of kata and that sixteen would be enough. He chose the kata which were best suited for physical stress and self-defense, stubbornly clinging to his belief that karate was an art rather than a sport. To him, kata was karate.
 
 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
 
 
REI and SETSU
REI is based on the respect of human dignity, and the willingness to express this respect. It is a way of improving relationship between individuals and is a contributing factor to social harmony.

SETSU is the way to express this concept in action, Those who practice Karatedo must deepen their understanding of the sprit of Rei, and in inter-personal relationships, strictly observe the rules of Setsu.
             DOJO KUN
Dojo Kun
  • Strive to perfect character
  • Defend the paths of truth
  • Guard against rash courage
  • Foster the spirit of effort
  • Honour the rules of etiquette
  • Hitotsu. Jinkaku Kansei ni Tsutomuro Koto.
  • Hitotsu. Makoto no Michi wo Mamoru Koto.
  • Hitotsu. Doryoku no Seishin o Yashinau Koto.
  • Hitotsu. Reigi o Omonzuru Koto.
  • Hitotsu. Kekki no Yu o Imashimuru Koto.
Kancho Hirokazu Kanazawa  




 

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Πέμπτη, 5 Ιουνίου 2014

OFFICIAL CYPRUS BRANCH




Hirokazu Kanazawa SOKE


Kancho Kanazawa 10th Dan - Chief Instructor Shotokan Karate-Do International Federation
Kanazawa Kancho (10th Dan Black Belt) is one of the world most renowned and respected traditional karate masters of all time.  He is the first karateka to have won the notorious All Japan karate Championship.
In 1957 kumite champion (while nursing a broken wrist)
In 1958 kumite and kata champion
Although trained in Judo in his early years, Kanazawa Kancho took up karate whilst at University under the late headmaster of JKA shotokan, sensei Matsatoshi Nakayama. Kanazawa Kancho is also one of the few remaining karateka privileged to have studied under Master Gichin Funakoshi, the famous Okinawin schoolteacher who brought karate to mainland Japan from Okinawa and founded the Shotokan style.
In 1978, Kanazawa Kancho set up SKIF (Shotokan Karatedo International Federation). SKIF is now the worlds largest Shotokan Karate Association under one chief instructor, having several million members in over 130 countries.














Nobuaki Kanazawa Kancho 








Hansi Shiro Ansano 9th Dan
(England)
                    Masaru Miura 9th Dan
(Italy)
Akio Nagai 8th Dan
(Germany)
Rikuta Koga 8th Dan
(Switzerland)

  
THE CHIEF INSTRUCTOR OF ISRAEL
OHAD RASHBA SENSEI


SHOTOKAN KARATE - DO INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION
OFFICIAL  CYPRUS  BRANCH


Shiro Asano Hanshi Letter of Apointment



Official Country Representative Chairman  
As from 18 of January 2014
Savvas Papademetriou
 



SHOTOKAN SHIHAN-KAI KARATE ACADEMY 
( MEMBER OF THE CYPRUS KARATE FEDERATION)

OFFICIAL DOJO 

38, Ag. Nektariou
(Behind Lanition Stadium) 

TRAINING HOURS

MONDAY TO FRIDAY 4.30 - 9 PM
SATURDAYS 5 PM - 8.30 PM

                    Tel: +35725254818  -   +3572525255704
    
email:  skiefcy@gmail.com  

Mob: +357 99678325

 ALL GRADES AND NEW STUDENTS ARE WELLCOME

=====> NEW STUDENTS AND ADVANCED CLASSES<====


DOJO PHOTOS















Photo Galery of the Anniversary Celebration of S.K.I -Israel in Limassol Cyprus 9/2013




Asano Hanshi Instructing















 

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